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MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) Words and Sentences, Desktop Scannable Forms - English (16-30 months) Package of 25

by Larry Fenson, Virginia A Marchman Donna J Thal, Philip S Dale, J Steven Reznick and Elizabeth Bates Brookes Publishing
Pub Date:
11/2006
ISBN:
9781557668936
Format:
Pbk 8 pages
Price:
AU$42.99 NZ$43.47
Product Status: In Stock Now
add to your cart
Professionals can learn a great deal about young children's emerging language and communication skills by consulting the ones who know the children best: their parents or caregivers.
CDIs.

At A Glance -
- Age range covered: 8-30 months (may also be used with older children who have developmental delays);

- Areas screened: Language and communication skills; Approximate time for the CDI: Each form generally takes 20-40 minutes to complete and 10-15 minutes to score;

- Who completes it: Parents or caregivers; professionals score;

- Validity and reliability: Numerous studies document the reliability and the validity of the instruments. The CDIs were normed on approximately 1,800 children in three locations, and the Inventories were normed on more than 2,000 children.

Now, with the CDIs professionals can tap into parents' invaluable day-to-day knowledge - and respond to legislation that requires parental input in child evaluations. Top language researchers developed these standardised, parent-completed report designing the forms to focus on current behaviors and salient emergent behaviors that parents can recognize and track. A ''words and gestures'' form.

The “words and sentences” form is for use with children ages 16–30 months. In the first part of each form, parents document the child’s production and use of hundreds of words divided into semantic categories. The second part analyzes the early phases of grammar, including the child’s understanding of word forms and the complexity of the child’s multi-word utterances. Parents identify the words the child has understood or used and provide written examples of the child’s three longest sentences.

CDI: Words and Gestures (pack of 20) Desktop Scannable
Larry Fenson, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at San Diego State University in California. Dr. Fenson has published research on infant attentiveness, early symbolic development, categorization, children's drawing skills, play, and early language development. He received his doctorate in child psychology from the University of Iowa. He served as Assistant Professor at the University of Denver and was a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development postdoctoral fellow with Jerome Kagan at Harvard University. Dr. Fenson is Chair of The CDI Advisory Board. Virginia A. Marchman, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas. Dr. Marchman holds a master of arts degree and a doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Research in Language at the University of California, San Diego. She has conducted research in several areas of language and cognitive development, language disorders, and early childhood development. Her most recent work focuses on the identification of precursors of language delay and individual differences in lexical and morphological development in monolingual English and bilingual (Spanish and English) speakers. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and was named Distinguished Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders. Dr. Marchman has worked on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories and the MacArthur Inventarios del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas for the last 15 years. She is author of the CDI Scoring Program'>CDI Scoring Program. Donna J. Thal, Ph.D., holds a master of science degree in speech pathology and audiology from Brooklyn College and a doctorate in speech and hearing sciences from the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). She has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Research in Language at UCSD, an assistant professor at Hofstra University, and an assistant professor at Queens College of CUNY. Dr. Thal is a developmental psycholinguist and a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist who has conducted research in a number of areas, including normal and disordered development of language and cognition, children with focal brain injury, and children with delayed onset of language. She has also carried out studies of language development in Spanish-speaking infants and toddlers. Her most recent work focuses on early identification of risk for clinically significant language impairment and is funded by a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD), within the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Thal is an editorial consultant for language for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. She was the California State nominee for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation Outstanding Clinical Achievement Award in 1996, received the Monty Distinguished Faculty Award from SDSU 1998 and the Albert W. Johnson Research Lecturer Award from SDSU in 1999, and was the Wang Family Excellence Award nominee from SDSU in 2000. She served a 4-year term on the Communicative Disorders Review Committee for the NIDCD from 1998 to 2002. Dr. Thal is a co-author of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories. Philip S. Dale, Ph.D., is Professor in Departments of Psychology, Linguistics, and Speech and Hearing Sciences at University of Washington. Dr. Dale's research interests include assessment of young children's language, language development in exceptional populations including linguistically precocious children, early language and cognition, and the effects of various models of intervention for young children with disabilities. J. Steven Reznick, Ph.D., is an affiliate of the Department of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Bates was a founding member of the Cognitive Science Department at University of California at San Diego (the first of its kind in the world), the Director of the federally-funded UCSD Project in Cognitive and Neural Development, a founding co-director of the innovative Joint Doctoral Program in Language and Communicative Disorders at San Diego State University and UCSD, and the Director of the Center for Research in Language and Professor of Cognitive Science at UCSD. With strengths in developmental psychology, linguistics, neurology, and cognitive science, she carried out many creative and influential collaborative studies on the interrelations among language acquisition, brain function, symbolic growth, and other key aspects of development. During her extensive career, she directed cross-linguistic studies on 4 continents and authored or co-authored 10 books and more than 200 scientific publications. Her work was interdisciplinary, influencing diverse fields such as neuroscience, linguistics, biology, psychology, computer science, and medicine. Philip S. Dale, Ph.D., is Professor in Departments of Psychology, Linguistics, and Speech and Hearing Sciences at University of Washington. Dr. Dale's research interests include assessment of young children's language, language development in exceptional populations including linguistically precocious children, early language and cognition, and the effects of various models of intervention for young children with disabilities. Larry Fenson, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at San Diego State University in California. Dr. Fenson has published research on infant attentiveness, early symbolic development, categorization, children's drawing skills, play, and early language development. He received his doctorate in child psychology from the University of Iowa. He served as Assistant Professor at the University of Denver and was a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development postdoctoral fellow with Jerome Kagan at Harvard University. Dr. Fenson is Chair of The CDI Advisory Board. Donna Jackson-Maldonado, Ph.D., is Professor at Department of Languages and Literature (Facultad de Lenguas y Letras) in Universidad Aut and #xF3;noma de Quer and #xE9;taro, Qa de Cedros, Mexico. Dr. Jackson-Maldonado was born in the United States but was brought up in Mexico. She has lived in a bilingual-bicultural environment all of her life. Her initial professional experience was as a speech-language pathologist working with children with language disorders and learning disabilities and deaf children. She also has worked for the Mexican government's special education and communication disorders programs, doing in-service training, writing books and manuals, and developing language assessment instruments. Dr. Jackson-Maldonado received her doctorate in linguistics from El Colegio de M and #xE9;xico in Mexico City. Her research has been in Spanish and bilingual language development in infants and toddlers. Part of this work was the development of the Mac-Arthur Inventarios del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas and, with Donna J. Thal, a language and gesture battery for Spanish speakers. Dr. Jackson-Maldonado is currently a full-time professor and researcher at the Universidad Aut and #xF3;noma de Quer and #xE9;taro in Mexico. She directs a project on late-talking Spanish-speaking toddlers. Virginia A. Marchman, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas. Dr. Marchman holds a master of arts degree and a doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Research in Language at the University of California, San Diego. She has conducted research in several areas of language and cognitive development, language disorders, and early childhood development. Her most recent work focuses on the identification of precursors of language delay and individual differences in lexical and morphological development in monolingual English and bilingual (Spanish and English) speakers. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and was named Distinguished Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders. Dr. Marchman has worked on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories and the MacArthur Inventarios del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas for the last 15 years. She is author of the CDI Scoring Program'>CDI Scoring Program. Donna J. Thal, Ph.D., holds a master of science degree in speech pathology and audiology from Brooklyn College and a doctorate in speech and hearing sciences from the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). She has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Research in Language at UCSD, an assistant professor at Hofstra University, and an assistant professor at Queens College of CUNY. Dr. Thal is a developmental psycholinguist and a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist who has conducted research in a number of areas, including normal and disordered development of language and cognition, children with focal brain injury, and children with delayed onset of language. She has also carried out studies of language development in Spanish-speaking infants and toddlers. Her most recent work focuses on early identification of risk for clinically significant language impairment and is funded by a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD), within the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Thal is an editorial consultant for language for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. She was the California State nominee for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation Outstanding Clinical Achievement Award in 1996, received the Monty Distinguished Faculty Award from SDSU 1998 and the Albert W. Johnson Research Lecturer Award from SDSU in 1999, and was the Wang Family Excellence Award nominee from SDSU in 2000. She served a 4-year term on the Communicative Disorders Review Committee for the NIDCD from 1998 to 2002. Dr. Thal is a co-author of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories. J. Steven Reznick, Ph.D., is an affiliate of the Department of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.