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Aid, NGOs and the Realities of Women's Lives: A perfect storm

by Tina Wallace & Fenella Porter Practical Action Publishing
Pub Date:
04/2013
ISBN:
9781853397790
Format:
Pbk 256 pages
Price:
AU$46.99 NZ$48.69
Product Status: Out of stock. Not available to order.

Other Available Formats:

Aid organizations have their origins in a desire to help the worlds poorest and most marginalized people but are they reaching these people? Factors are coming together that put pressure on NGOs working in development: the economic crisis, the growing conditionality of aid, and increased competition for funding between NGOs. This creates a perfect storm driven by a new language of aid, policies and procedures leaving poor women behind. This book explores how international NGOs are navigating these rapid changes that challenge their role and legitimacy, values, and overall purpose. The writers see a crisis for NGOs as they are pulled further from those they claim to work with; they also explore alternative ways of conceptualizing development, and of bringing about improvements for the most marginalized and increasingly unheard women. This book is essential reading for development practitioners and those working on womens rights, as well as NGO staff , researchers, and students of development studies.

1.IntroductionTina Wallace and Fenella PorterSection One A Perfect Storm2.Development from the ground: A worms eye viewStan Thekaekara 3.Evaluation, complexity, uncertainty theories of change and some alternativesChris Mowles4. Losing Sight of our Purpose?Suzanne Walker5. Can girls save the world?Kate Grosser and Nikki van der Gaag6. Lost in Translation: Gender Mainstreaming in AfghanistanAnastasiya Hozyainova7. Insulating the Developing Classes Tom Scott-Smith8. Reconnecting Development Policy, People and History David LewisSection Two Changing conversations9. Taking our lead from reality - an open practice for social development David Harding10. Women on wheels Meenu Vadera11.Too young to be women, too old to be girls: The Changing Aid landscape and the reality of girls at risk Seri Wendoh12. Looking Beyond the Numbers: reducing violence against women in Ghana Kanwal Ahluwalia13. From local to global and back again learning from Stepping Stones Alice Welbourn14.Peace Practice Examined Bridget Walker15. I dont know ... and related thoughtsAshish Shah16.Apolitical stories of sanitation and suffering women Deepa Joshi17.ConclusionTina Wallace

This is a wake-up call to those in the development industry who are driving the current obsession with results.Professor Andrea Cornwall, Department of Anthropology, Sussex University Anyone with a personal or professional interest in development, let alone gender and development, should read this important book.Sylvia Chant, Professor of Development Geography, London School of Economics and Political ScienceThis book is far more than a critique. The authors also offer positive examples from around the world about how conversations, evidence and relationships can be approached completely differently.Emma Crewe, Visiting Reader and Research Associate, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, SOAS, University of London
Tina Wallace has worked in development, as an academic, practitioner and activist for over 35 years and has conducted reviews with the major NGOs including Oxfam, ActionAid, WaterAid, Amnesty International, as well as IIED and the UKs Department for International Development. Fenella Porter is a lecturer at Birkbeck College, University of London, and has over 20 years experience in development and gender work and research, with NGOs and womens organisations at national and international levels.