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Developing Motor and Social Skills: Activities for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

by Christopher Denning Rowman and Littlefield
Pub Date:
05/2017
ISBN:
9781475817652
Format:
Pbk 112 pages
Price:
AU$49.99 NZ$51.30
Product Status: Available in Approx 5 days
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This book focuses on motor and social skills development for young children with autism spectrum disorder and is geared toward special education teachers, general education teachers, and related personnel. This book will outline what we now know about how physical activity impacts children with Autism and how classroom teachers can use physical activity programs in their classrooms.

Dedication
Table of Figures
Table of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Chapter 1
Key questions
What do children with ASD need to succeed in school?
Evidence-based strategies and supports
Universal design for learning
Visual supports
Routines and procedures
Priming
Choice
Takeaways
References
Chapter 2
Key questions
Importance of motor development and physical activity
Challenge for children with ASD
Benefits of increased motor development and physical activity Optimizing the effects of physical activity and exercise
Takeaways
References
Chapter 3
Key questions
Links between motor and social development
Implications for classroom performance and support
Takeaways
References
Chapter 4
Key questions
Key ideas for organization
Structure
Setting
Materials
Frequency and duration
Child/adult ratio
Instructional methodologies
Universal design for learning
Activity schedules
Priming
Visual supports
Modeling and guided practice
Routines and procedures
Social narratives
Other considerations
References
Chapter 5
What does it look like?
Aerobic exercise or physical activity
How can I do it?
Aerobic exercise or physical activity?
Activities for physical activity/aerobic exercise
Motor development and complex motor movements
Activities for motor development and complex motor movements
Meditation or calming activity
Activities for meditation or calming activity
Where can I get more information?
Takeaways
References
Chapter 6
Key questions
Selection of target skills
Supporting skills in the classroom
Environmental modifications
Positive reinforcement
Picture schedules
Priming or previewing
Modeling and role play
Scripts or cue cards
Social narratives
Peer mediated interventions
Takeaways
References
Chapter 7
Key questions
Collaborating with families
Support
Communication
Participation
Feedback
IEP goals
Collaborating with other professionals
Physical education
Occupational therapists
Paraprofessionals
Takeaways
References

A growing body of research shows that many children with autism spectrum have significant deficits in motor and physical fitness. This new resource provides practical, step-by-step information that can help both special education teachers and parents create and implement motor and fitness programs specifically geared to the unique learning needs of children with ASD. Readers will particular benefit from chapters explaining the use of visual supports, modeling and other unique teaching methods as well as detailed information on organizing a motor program.
Christopher Denning, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Special Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education and Human Development, University of Massachusetts, Boston.