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Oldest Living Things in the World

by Rachel Sussman University of Chicago Press
Pub Date:
03/2014
ISBN:
9780226057507
Format:
Hbk 170 pages
Price:
AU$110.00 NZ$113.04
Product Status: In Stock Now
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The Oldest Living Things in the World is an epic journey through time and space. Over the past decade, artist Rachel Sussman has researched, worked with biologists, and traveled the world from Antarctica to the Mojave Desert in order to photograph continuously living organisms that are at least 2,000 years old. The result is a stunning and unique visual collection of species unlike anything that has been created in the arts or sciences before. Sussman's work is both timeless and timely, and the book spans disciplines, continents, and millennia. Underlying the work is an innate environmentalism driven by Sussman and rsquo;s relentless curiosity. She begins at and ldquo;year zero, and rdquo; and looks back from there, photographing the past in the present. The ancient subjects live on every continent and range from Greenlandic lichens that grow only one centimeter per century, to unique desert shrubs in Africa and South America, predatory fungus in Oregon, Caribbean brain coral, and an 80,000-year-old colony of aspen in Utah. She journeyed to Antarctica to photograph 5,500-year-old moss; Australia for stromatolites, which are organisms tied to the oxygenation of the planet and the beginnings of life on Earth; and Tasmania to capture a 43,600-year-old self-propagating shrub that and rsquo;s the last of its kind. These portraits reveal the living history of our planet and mdash;and what we stand to lose in the future. These ancient survivors have weathered millennia in some of the world and rsquo;s most extreme environments, yet climate change and human interaction have put many of the species presented here in danger. Two of her subjects have already met with an untimely death. Alongside the photographs, Sussman combines tales of her worldly adventures tracking down these subjects with informative insight from the scientists who are studying them and their environments. The result is an original index of millennia-old organisms that provides a record and celebration of the past, a call to action in the present, and a barometer of our future.
Rachel Sussman is a contemporary artist based in Brooklyn. Her photographs and writing have been featured in such places as the New York Tim1213es, Wall Street Journal, Guardian, and NPR and rsquo;s Picture Show. She is a trained member of the Climate Reality Leadership Corps, has spoken on her work at TED and the Long Now Foundation, and it has been exhibited in museums and galleries in the United States and Europe. Carl Zimmer is the author of numerous books, including Microcosm; Parasite Rex; Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea; At the Water and rsquo;s Edge; and Soul Made Flesh. His numerous essays and articles on the life sciences have appeared in the pages of the New York Times, Scientific American, Discover, Time, Science, Popular Science , and National Geographic. His work has been anthologized in both The Best American Science Writing and The Best American Science and Nature Writing series. He is also a two-time winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and rsquo;s Science Journalism Award and winner of the National Academies Communication Award. He is a lecturer at Yale University, where he teaches writing about science and the environment.